Coronavirus disease COVID-19 outbreak. Microscopic view of a infectious virus. SARS-CoV-2 virus cell. 3D Rendering

A team of scientists believe they might have developed personal protective equipment (PPE) that can be sprayed into noses and mouths to shield people from the virus that causes COVID-19.

Researchers at University of California San Francisco have engineered "AeroNabs," a synthetic molecule that is self-administered once a day as a nasal spray or inhaler to protect people from SARS-CoV-2, reports the university website. The researchers say it's possible the spray could be used as a trustworthy protection against the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 until a vaccine is developed for the virus.

Currently, researchers are only experimentally using AeroNabs, but they hope they can secure partnerships that would allow the molecule to be manufactured for use in clinical trials. If the trials were to go as planned, the scientists say they would make AeroNabs available as an inexpensive protection and treatment for COVID-19. 

AeroNabs Co-Inventor Peter Walter says the protective molecule is more effective against COVID-19 than wearable PPE.

Click here to read the rest of UCSF's report on AeroNabs.

Looking for a better understanding of the difference between COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2? Click here for a detailed explanation from CleanLink.com.