One of the most popular upsells for distributors is the hard-surface attachment. This tool ranges in size from about 12 to 20 inches and is typically used on hard flooring to replace dust mopping.

“There are so many types of flooring nowadays,” says Payne. “Some floors are being sold as ‘no maintenance’ and people aren’t putting finish on them, so you have to be careful of pushing anything with a brush on it that will scratch the floor.”

The hard surface tool eliminates the gap between the brush and the suction from a vacuum cleaner, providing direct contact with the floor, says Payne. Some attachments are outlined with thin rubber that will not damage the floor but still allow the tool to slide with ease.

Allen’s bestseller is a 20-inch hard-surface tool with a short-bristle brush that allows for good air flow and contour on floor surfaces.

“Anytime I talk to customers about backpack vacuums, I discuss a floor tool for hard floors that allows them to sweep instead of dust mopping,” he says. “For about the same cost as a dust mop, this accessory allows you to use the backpack in places that continue to collect dirt, dust and debris, like stairs, hallways and tile and grout entryways.”

Ben Wright, outside sales rep for HP Products, Indianapolis, says the hard-surface tool is the only one he recommends that doesn’t come standard with the machine. He’s had success selling it to schools but says that it can be used in any facility where heavy dust mopping occurs.

“It’s a great upsell, because not only is it a labor savings, but it’s a quality improvement,” he says. “A lot of folks will skip that dust mopping step and use their autoscrubber, which can gum up the squeegee. So things you can’t truly measure are being impacted by the lack of dust mopping.”

Vacuuming floors is faster than dust mopping them. Using this attachment will also remove dust mop replacement costs.
 
“Also, if you don’t change your dust mop you’re just dragging dirt over your nicely finished floors, which acts like sandpaper and creates scratches,” says Wright.