How do you know when it’s time to replace a floor pad?


All pads have an estimated life span based in square footage, but it’s important to note that most pads are developed for double-sided use. The best practice is to observe how well the pad is performing on the floor. Generally speaking, when a pad has lost 50 percent of its original weight and thickness, it is time to replace the pad.
— John Miller, VP of Executive Sales and Marketing, Americo Manufacturing Company, Acworth, Georgia

The life of a floor pad fluctuates based upon the many variable conditions that exist, such as: how dirty the floor is, how often a floor is cleaned or polished, how solid the floor finish is, and how fast the machine is running at, let alone how much experience the operator possesses.
In general, however, floor pads will need to be changed when you can see the face loaded up or when the pad starts to produce less results requiring more passes. Time is money and a fresh high performing pad is most desirable.
— Rory Beaudette, VP Sales/COO, ACS Industries, Inc., Lincoln, Rhode Island

Pads need to be replaced when there is an excessive “load” of dirt and grime on the surface and throughout the pad. Also, watch for pad “thinning” and loss of resiliency, or aggressiveness as it relates to scrubbing and stripping. These are signs that the pad is compromised.
— Dennis Knapp, Director of Product Development, Impact Products, Toledo, Ohio

Replacement is necessary when the pad loses its effectiveness in doing the job it is manufactured for. In the case of the strip and pad, it may load up with finish and no longer effectively strip the floor. It may also wear off the abrasives and no longer remove the finish. A burnishing pad may become dirty, loaded with finish it is removing or become ripped and no longer be effective.
— Randall Flowers, Vice President of Corporate Accounts, ETC of Henderson, Inc., Henderson, North Carolina

What maintenance tips do you recommend to extend the life of pads?


Pads must be cleaned after every use. Do not soak pads in cleaning or stripping solution as this will break down binder over time. Use a hose with a garden nozzle with hot water to remove soils and finish from the pad.
It’s important that you don’t allow soil or finish to dry on the pad. If they can’t be cleaned immediately, store soiled pads in a plastic liner bag to keep them moist until they can be properly cleaned.
In addition to cleaning, departments should use proper pad driving accessories on machines. An improper or worn pad holder allows the pad to move, which may cause damage.
— John Miller, VP of Executive Sales and Marketing, Americo Manufacturing Company, Acworth, Georgia

Clean floor pads after each use — water for cleaning/buffing/stripping pads, "dust off" for dry burnishing pads. Alternating between several floor pads during each cleaning task. Also never leave a pad under a machine with full weight on the floor. Avoid damaging edges against shelving. And avoid any bolts or other items sticking up off the floor surface, which could damage web integrity.
— Dennis Knapp, Director of Product Development, Impact Products, Toledo, Ohio

Take the pad off of the machine, rinse it, brush it out and hang it to dry after each use. In the case of natural fiber pads, it is not recommended to rinse the pad. With natural fiber pads, simply brush it out with the center hole and hang it up so it can be used again. Stripping pads can be rinsed in stripping solution.
— Randall Flowers, Vice President of Corporate Accounts, ETC of Henderson, Inc., Henderson, North Carolina

Pad life can be extended by taking regular care. Pads should be cleaned and rinsed after use to remove soil then hung to dry. This process will extend pad life vs not doing so at all.
— Rory Beaudette, VP Sales/COO, ACS Industries, Inc., Lincoln, Rhode Island